El calendario de adviento (de ciencia) 2016 del Instituto Max-Planck

El calendario de Adviento del Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, presenta una imagen de ciencia –y su explicación– cada día.

Hasta el 24 de diciembre, se pueden ir descubriendo las sorpresas científicas escondidas tras cada número con un simple ‘clic’.

Y el día 1 de diciembre esconde… Very tough and extremely flexible:

Día 1: Very tough and extremely flexible. © MPG

Día 1: Very tough and extremely flexible. © MPG

Bones are not just a static support structure, but a living organ. They can adapt to mechanical loads, heal after injuries and are an important part of the human hormonal system. All this requires a close interplay between hard, mineralized tissue and a highly specialized cell network. This picture shows the complex structures in the thigh bone of an adult: tiny 0.1 millimetre thick cavities, through which blood vessels pass, are concentrically surrounded by mineralized fibres (white) with different orientations. Cavities in the tissue contain the bone cells, osteocytes, which are connected to one another by innumerable, incredibly fine channels (red). Mechanical strain results in liquid flows through the channels, which are registered by the cells and converted into biochemical signals. These transmitters are transported to the blood vessels via the network and distributed throughout the entire organism.

Explicación de la imagen, MPG

Hay que tener paciencia para ir descubriendo las imágenes escondidas tras cada día del mes de diciembre (hasta el día 24)… porque el botón correspondiente se activa ese mismo día.

¡Una gran iniciativa para disfrutar y aprender!

–oOo–

Día 2 de diciembre nos muestra A winter forest made up of plant hair:

Día 1: A winter forest made up of plant hair. © MPG

Día 2: A winter forest made up of plant hair. © MPG

Densely packed tiny plant hairs cover the surface of the blossom of kangaroo paw, which grows in the sunny, humid parts of Western Australia. The iridescent colours attract honeyeaters – songbirds that suck out the nectar using their long, curved beaks, transferring the plants’ pollen in the process. The colourfulness of the tiny hairs is due to the pigments they contain, which are known as phenylphenalenones. This group of natural plant substances also play a major role in protecting against pests, for example in banana plants. Bananas are, in many countries, a staple food and an important export product. However, high-yield varieties are especially vulnerable to pests, especially fungi and threadworms. In contrast, varieties that produce high concentrations of phenylphenalenones are much more resilient. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology are investigating the ecological role of this plant substance – whether in bananas or kangaroo paws.

Explicación de la imagen, MPG

–oOo–

Día 3 de diciembre se centra en Mirror, mirror, …

Día 3: Mirror, mirror, ... © MPG

Día 3: Mirror, mirror, … © MPG

Power plants? Rocket engines? Mega air conditioning system? No, what you see here are seven complex mirror modules of eROSITA (extended roentgen survey with an imaging telescope array). From 2018 onwards, the ultra-modern telescope will survey the entire sky in X-ray light more accurately than ever before. What is more, the Russian-German mission is to chart the hidden universe and precisely determine the proportions of dark matter and dark energy. For this purpose, the observatory operates from a location of 1.5 million kilometres from Earth, measuring some 100,000 galaxy clusters. In order for eROSITA to absorb the high-energy X-radiation, the scientists provided each of the mirror modules with 54 gold-plated nickel shells. The surface roughness is less than less than a millionth of a millimetre. The high-tech instrument will be mounted on a Russian satellite platform in the next few weeks. Its take-off from the Russian space aerodrome Baikonur is schedule for early 2018. 

Explicación de la imagen, MPG

–oOo–

Día 4 de diciembre se ilumina con Illuminated advertising for Buddha’s temples:

Día 4: Illuminated advertising for Buddha's temples. © MPG

Día 4: Illuminated advertising for Buddha’s temples. © MPG

Twice a year Kanchi’in, a Buddhist temple in Tokyo, organizes the 24-hour ceremony ‘Fudan Nenbutsu” – a chanting prayer to Buddha that last all day. The focus is on Buddhist songs, which are transmitted via livestreaming over the internet. At night, the temple is illuminated by candle-lit lanterns made of paper, on which people have written their wishes. At the event’s closing, the abbot reads out the texts. The ceremony is intended to encourage people to take part in a religious ceremony. Similar to the problem faced by churches in European cities, temples in Japan are attracting fewer and fewer visitors. Ethnologists are interested in the strategies that Buddhist temples in Tokyo employ to modernize and attempt to reverse the decline. Especially in the Japanese capital, one of the world’s largest and most expensive urban centres, there is a lot of pressure to actually make use of the religious buildings.

Explicación de la imagen, MPG

–oOo–

Día 5 de diciembre, unas criaturas muy, muy pequeñas, y un poco ‘feas’ en Bristly little creatures:

Día 5: Bristly little creatures. © MPG

Día 5: Bristly little creatures. © MPG

This mini-monster is the two-week-old larvae of the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii. It is roughly half a millimetre long and lives at the bottom of marine areas near to the coast. It uses its protruding fine bristles to protect itself against enemies and for movement. Platynereis is a popular model organism among geneticists and neuroscientists. It is easy to keep in an aquarium and happy to live on a diet of spinach and dry fish food. An artificial lunar cycle causes the animals to reproduce. Worms with particular properties can thus be bred through genetic engineering. Researchers are using them to investigate which neuronal mechanisms govern the migration movement of plankton. To do so, they combine genetics, neurobiology, behavioural studies and imaging techniques. The studies provide insights into how the nervous system works in marine organisms and increase our general understanding of animal behaviour.

Explicación de la imagen, MPG

–oOo–

Día 6 de diciembre, una bella danza, Cosmic dance:

Día 6: Cosmic dance. © MPG

Día 6: Cosmic dance. © MPG

Albert Einstein first postulated them in his general theory of relativity over 100 years ago. But gravitational waves were only directly measured for the first time on 14 September 2015. These tiny distortions in space-time occur almost constantly in the universe; however, they can only be ‘heard’ by using highly sensitive detectors when very large masses move very quickly – such as when two black holes collide. This was the very event that astronomers observed in September 2015. This image depicts the source of the waves as dark spots: the two black holes with masses of 29 and 36 times that of the Sun respectively, dance around one another and will merge into one in just a few moments. The signal detected on Earth provides information about the invisible space and the nature of gravitation. This opens up a completely new window on the universe for gravitational wave astronomy.

Explicación de la imagen, MPG

–oOo–

Día 7 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 8 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 9 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 10 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 11 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 12 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 13 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 14 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 15 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 16 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 17 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 18 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 19 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 20 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 21 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 22 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Día 23 de diciembre…

–oOo–

Y el día 24 de diciembre…

–oOo–

FIN

1 Response to “El calendario de adviento (de ciencia) 2016 del Instituto Max-Planck”


  1. 1 Marta MS 01/12/2016 a las 09:05

    Reblogueó esto en Martams's Blogy comentado:

    El calendario de adviento (de ciencia) 2016 del Instituto Max-Planck

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